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Faculty of Law, Business & Economics

International Economics – Juniorprofessor Christian Fischer

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Research

My research evolves around the following areas and topics:

  • International Trade
    Sourcing Strategies of Multinational Enterprises
    Financial Management of Export Activities
    Incomplete Contracts in Cross-Border Transactions
  • Industrial Organization
    Collusion
    Bargaining
    Firm Pricing Strategies



Working papers:
 

  • Collusion and Bargaining in Asymmetric Cournot Duopoly – An Experiment (with Hans-Theo Normann)

    [new version, DICE Discussion Paper No 283]

    Revise and resubmit, European Economic Review

    Abstract. In asymmetric dilemma games without side payments, players face involved cooperation and bargaining problems. The maximization of joint profits is implausible, players disagree on the collusive action, and the outcome is often inefficient. 
    For the example of a Cournot duopoly with asymmetric cost, we investigate experimentally how players cooperate (collude implicitly and explicitly), if at all, in such games. We find that, without communication, players fail to cooperate and essentially play the static Nash equilibrium, confirming previous results. With communication, inefficient firms gain at the expense of efficient ones. When the role of the efficient firm is earned in a contest, the efficient firm earns higher profits than when this role is randomly allocated. Bargaining solutions do not satisfactorily predict collusive outcomes. Finally, when given the choice to talk, the efficient firms often decline that option.



Work in progress:

  • Payment Contracts and Trade Finance in Export Relationships

  • Complex Pricing and Consumer-Side Transparency (with Alexander Rasch)

  • Offshoring Skill-intensive Jobs (with Hartmut Egger)

  • Forum Selection in International Commercial Contracts (with Miriam Frey)


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